Chemicals found in everyday fruits could minimise organ damage after heart attack and stroke

05 Nov 2014

Scientists have identified chemicals found in some everyday fruit that could protect vital organs from long-term damage following a heart attack or stroke, according to new research carried out in mice. The researchers now hope the chemicals will provide a starting point for developing new injectable drugs that could be used to prevent some of the long-term damage caused by heart attack and stroke.

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Early stage embryo

Shaping up: Researchers reconstruct early stages of embryo development

04 Nov 2014

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have managed to reconstruct the early stage of mammalian development using embryonic stem cells, showing that a critical mass of cells – not too few, but not too many – is needed for the cells to being self-organising into the correct structure for an embryo to form.

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Norovirus

Scientists take step towards drug to treat norovirus stomach bug

21 Oct 2014

An experimental drug currently being trialled for influenza and Ebola viruses could have a new target: norovirus, often known as the winter vomiting virus. A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has shown that the drug, favipiravir, is effective at reducing – and in some cases eliminating – norovirus infection in mice.

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Grandmother and grandchildren

Inherited ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy may be limited to children and grandchildren

10 Jul 2014

When a pregnant mother is undernourished, her child is at a greater than average risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes, in part due to so-called ‘epigenetic’ effects. A new study in mice demonstrates that this ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for her grandchildren as well – in other words, to adapt an old maxim, ‘you are what your grandmother ate’.

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NICE approves MS drug developed by University of Cambridge researchers

28 May 2014

A new drug based on decades of research at the University of Cambridge has today been approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) for use in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Clinical trials have shown that Alemtuzumab, marketed under the name Lemtrada, reduces disease activity, limits the accumulation of further disability over time and may even allow some existing damage to recover.

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Functional nerve cells from skin cells

22 May 2014

Research will make the study of diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s easier, and could lead to personalised therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative disorders.

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