The University of Cambridge is leading one of eleven new Doctoral Training Partnerships announced today by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

This programme will help realise the potential of our outstanding doctoral students and early-career researchers by giving them the skills they will need to provide intellectual leadership, to transform their disciplines, and to become champions for the enduring value of arts and humanities research.

Professor Simon Franklin, Head of the School of Arts and Humanities

The AHRC’s £14m funding award will be supplemented by the collegiate University to create an innovative programme aimed at developing the next generation of arts and humanities researchers. 

40 doctoral studentships will be funded each year for the next five years. Studentships will be available in subjects across the arts and humanities throughout Cambridge.

DTP students will join Cambridge’s world-leading arts and humanities research environment, benefitting not only from supervision by internationally-recognised scholars, but from membership of a large, diverse community of outstanding doctoral and masters students.

Through working with the university’s networks of partnerships and collaborations, DTP students will develop skills in public engagement, knowledge exchange, international collaboration and research leadership skills alongside their academic work.

The University’s Doctoral Training Partnership is a collaborative programme, which will be delivered in partnership with the Norfolk Museums and Archive Service, the Collections Trust, the Institute of Historical Research, and the Arts Council.

The University is also part of two successful consortium bids also awarded funding by the AHRC: The Centre for East European Language-based Area Studies, a consortium led by UCL (University College London); and the AHRC Doctoral Programme in Celtic Languages, led by the University of Glasgow.

“This programme will help realise the potential of our outstanding doctoral students and early-career researchers by giving them the skills they will need to provide intellectual leadership, to transform their disciplines, and to become champions for the enduring value of arts and humanities research,” said Professor Simon Franklin, Head of the School of Arts and Humanities

Professor Rick Rylance, Chief Executive of the AHRC, said: “We are delighted at how the sector, and partners beyond the sector, have responded, and we look forward to working closely with them to support the next generation. Postgraduate support remains the largest item of expenditure in the AHRC’s budget, but it doesn’t match the demand arising naturally from the very many talented people in the arts and humanities research community. ”

More information about the University of Cambridge’s AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership, including how to apply, is available at: http://www.csah.cam.ac.uk/ahrcdtp


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