Super-slow circulation allowed world’s oceans to store huge amounts of carbon during the last ice age

27 Jun 2016

The way the ocean transported heat, nutrients and carbon dioxide at the peak of the last ice age, about 20,000 years ago, is significantly different than what has previously been suggested, according to two new studies. The findings suggest that the colder ocean circulated at a very slow rate, which enabled it to store much more carbon for much longer than the modern ocean.

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Diabetes sniffer dogs? ‘Scent’ of hypos could aid development of new tests

27 Jun 2016

A chemical found in our breath could provide a flag to warn of dangerously-low blood sugar levels in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The finding, published today in the journal Diabetes Care, could explain why some dogs can be trained to spot the warning signs in patients.

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Article 50 is ‘only credible way’ for Brexit, says leading EU law expert

21 Jun 2016

Cambridge law professor says Article 50 is the only legal mechanism for Brexit, countering assertions by Vote Leave ‘roadmap’ that Article 50 is “not the sole lawful means”. He says the roadmap’s proposals for ‘emergency’ legislation during exit negotiations could actually diminish rather than restore Westminster’s sovereignty.

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Carrots and sticks fail to change behaviour in cocaine addiction

16 Jun 2016

People who are addicted to cocaine are particularly prone to developing habits that render their behaviour resistant to change, regardless of the potentially devastating consequences, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The findings may have important implications for the treatment of cocaine addiction as they help explain why such individuals take drugs even when they are aware of the negative consequences, and why they find their behaviour so difficult to change.

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Astronomers observe most distant oxygen ever

16 Jun 2016

An international team of astronomers have detected glowing oxygen in a distant galaxy seen just 700 million years after the Big Bang. This is the most distant galaxy in which oxygen has ever been unambiguously detected, and it is most likely being ionised by powerful radiation from young giant stars. This galaxy could be an example of one type of source responsible for cosmic reionisation in the early history of the Universe.

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