The diverse range of exhibitions, lectures and other events organised by the University, and associated institutions, continues through Easter and beyond. Here are a few of the highlights.

The diverse range of exhibitions, lectures and other events organised by the University, and associated institutions, continues through Easter and beyond. Here are a few of the highlights.

Kunisada and Kabuki Part I
Now until 3 June
An exhibition of the work of Utagwa Kunisada, one of the leading print designers of the late Edo period at the Fitzwilliam Museum. The exhibition focuses on his prints of Kabuki actors. For details of opening times, look at the web site.

Fantasy to Federation
Now until 15 September
From Fantasy to Federation, at the University Library. An exhibition of maps of Australia. For details of opening times, look at the web site.

Writing on the walls
17 - 21 April
Cambridge University Library has commissioned a collection of carved slates from the Cardozo Kindersley Workshop. The collection unites the history of literary culture with the beauty of hand-carved lettering. Each slate is inscribed with a quotation, beginning in the 3rd Century BC with Ecclesiastes - "Of making many books there is no end" and ends in the 20th century with the typographer Eric Gill - "Letters are not pictures of things". For details of opening times, look at the web site.

Sleeping giants: volcanoes and climate change
26 April, 7pm
Robert White, Professor of Geophysics in the Department of Earth Sciences and a Fellow of the Royal Society, will discuss the enormous volcanic eruptions which occur continually along the lines of the mid-ocean ridges that encircle the world. He will explore the reasons behind these eruptions, and show the results of them globally. He will also describe the work being done in Cambridge to understand them better and to monitor the presence of molten rock in the earth's crust beneath active volcanoes around the world. The lecture is part of the Cambridge Discovery Talks series and will take place in the Sedgwick Museum.

The challenges of education exclusion: the Zambian experience
30 April, 4.45pm
The first in a new international seminar series on development and education which is being run by local charity CamFed and the University's African Studies Centre. Barbra Chilangwa, Zambian Deputy Permanent Secretary for Education will be the speaker and the lecture will introduced by Amartya Sen, the Nobel prize-winning economist and Master of Trinity College. The lecture will take place in the Mill Lane Lecture Room 3, Mill Lane.

Making A Life - Identity, Reason and Education
30 April - 2 May
This year the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures 2001 will be given by Anthony K Appiah, Professor of Afro-American Studies and Philosophy at the University of Harvard. There are three lectures in the series. Professor Appiah's work spans the philosophy of language and of mind; literary theory and the history and theory of nationalism and ideas of race. For more information contact Nicola Pulman on 01223 332368.

The Novel in 2001
17 May, 5pm
The journalist and novelist Philip Hensher will give a talk on the state of the novel. Dr Hensher is a regular columnist for The Independent newspaper, the author of several acclaimed novels and is a judge on this year's panel for the Booker Prize. His talk will be introduced by AS Byatt, who won the Booker in 1990 for her novel Possession: A Romance. The lecture will take place in Lady Mitchell Hall, Sidgwick Site.

Mono-Ha
22 May - 22 July
Mono-Ha is the name given to a number of artists working in Japan in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Using mostly found or natural materials, their works sought to challenge conventional notions of art. This will be the first exhibition of Mono-Ha in Britain. The exhibition is at
Kettle's Yard Gallery. For details of opening times, look at the web site.


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