Obsessive-compulsive disorder - does age matter?

10 Oct 2014

The Max Perutz Science Writing Award aims to encourage and recognise outstanding written communication among MRC PhD students. The annual competition challenges entrants to write an 800-word article for the general public answering the question: 'Why does my research matter?'. This year, Julia Gottwald, a PhD student in the Department of Psychiatry, was shortlisted for her article about obsessive compulsive disorder.

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Luck and lava

06 Oct 2014

A team of researchers from Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences have recently returned from Iceland where, thanks to a bit of luck, they have gathered the most extensive dataset ever from a volcanic eruption, which will likely yield considerable new insights into how molten rock moves underground, and whether or not it erupts.

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Stem cells: master builders, drug testers, immortal elements

01 Oct 2014

Today, we commence a month-long focus on research on stem cells. To begin, Professors Austin Smith and Robin Franklin discuss how Cambridge scientists are helping to provide a stream of new knowledge about how our bodies are made and maintained, and how stem cells can fulfil the promise of being one of medical research’s great hopes.

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Why teach oracy?

01 Sep 2014

In this article, Professor of Education Neil Mercer argues that ‘talk’ needs tuition; state schools must teach spoken language skills for the sake of social equality.

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Monitoring Bárðarbunga and Holuhraun

26 Aug 2014

Cambridge scientists and PhD students are at the forefront of monitoring the activity of the Bárðarbunga volcano in Iceland. The research group, led by Professor Bob White of the Department of Earth Sciences, is monitoring the ongoing massive volcanic intrusion through its array of seismic instrumentation - never before has such an intrusion been so well documented. The data they gather is likely to yield considerable new insights into how molten rock moves underground, and whether or not it erupts. Here, Professor White outlines the team’s ongoing work in Iceland.

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Looking for King Lear in Kashmir

22 Aug 2014

Dr Preti Taneja first read King Lear as a teenager and immediately saw parallels with the Indian culture of her parents’ homeland. Almost 20 years later, she spent six months exploring the subcontinent, tracing the themes that make Shakespeare’s exploration of humanity so compelling, and researching a novel that re-imagines her favourite play. 

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On not forgetting Nadine Gordimer

16 Jul 2014

In this article, originally posted on the CRASSH website, Graham Riach – a PhD candidate in the English Faculty working on South African literature – explores the life and legacy of writer Nadine Gordimer, who recently passed away.

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