Graphene: Taking the wonder-stuff from dream to reality

24 Jan 2013

A centre for research on graphene, a material which has the potential to revolutionise numerous industries, ranging from healthcare to electronics, is to be created at the University of Cambridge. The University has been a hub for graphene engineering from the very start and now aims to make this “wonder material” work in real-life applications.

Read More
Detail from a hybrid three-dimensional heterostructure consisting of graphene, boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide in two dimensional layers.

Changing our material future, layer by layer

20 Dec 2012

Researchers are aiming to develop a new class of materials with remarkable properties using one atom-thick substances such as graphene and other two dimensional crystals in a new collaborative project.

Read More
Edge of silicon ingot

Solar-grade silicon at low cost

18 Apr 2012

A new process developed by scientists at the University of Cambridge has the potential to drive down the cost of manufacturing solar-grade silicon and could increase the use of photovoltaic devices for capturing the sun’s energy.

Read More
An LED emitting light on a 6-inch silicon wafer.

All set and ready to glow

03 Feb 2012

A breakthrough technique for manufacturing LEDs on silicon is to be exploited in the UK, putting mass-produced, energy-efficient lighting within reach.

Read More
A section of an Ashby chart

It’s a material world

15 Sep 2011

A spin-out from Cambridge's Engineering Department and a leading supplier of materials information technology software to industry, Granta Design has achieved an average growth of 30 per cent over the past ten years.

Read More
butterfly-bank-fraud

How butterflies’ wings could cut bank fraud

28 May 2010

Cambridge scientists have discovered a way of mimicking the stunningly bright and beautiful colours found on the wings of tropical butterflies. The findings could have important applications in the security printing industry, helping to make bank notes and credit cards harder to forge.

Read More

Pages