Profile: palaeontologist Dr Kenneth McNamara

01 Feb 2013

In 1990, Cambridge palaeontologist Kenneth McNamara stumbled on a poignant illustration in an obscure book by a Victorian archaeologist. The find rekindled a childhood obsession, and after two decades of dogged research he discovered it's an obsession that has been shared by humans for 400,000 years.

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A visitor from the sea

31 Jan 2013

The skeleton of a fin whale, suspended outside the entrance of the Museum of Zoology, has inspired awe and affection among sightseers and scientists for the past 145 years. We trace its epic journey from the open sea to the centre of Cambridge

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Original manuscript of Fauna Cantabrigiensis

The remarkable notebook of a 19th-century naturalist

09 Jan 2013

A notebook recording the fauna of Cambridgeshire observed and collected by the Reverend Leonard Jenyns between 1820 and 1849 has been published in full for the first time. A significant naturalist in his own right, Jenyns turned down the offer of a place on HMS Beagle, recommending instead a younger colleague, Charles Darwin.

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Seahorse

Seahorses and the "onion world"

24 May 2012

Dr Amanda Vincent – one of the world’s leading experts on seahorses and their relatives – is spending a year at Cambridge’s Department of Geography on a sabbatical from the University of British Columbia. She is introducing some new ideas into conservation discussion groups at Cambridge.

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A Priscilla Barrett exhibition opens at the Zoology Museum on March 23

Carnivores of the world

22 Mar 2012

An exhibition of beautiful, detailed paintings depicting all the World’s carnivores by top wildlife artist Priscilla Barrett will be on display at the University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge from Friday March 23 until Thursday April 5 inclusive.

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Grouper and moray.

Memory like a fish

09 Dec 2011

The traditional belief that fish have short memory spans may not be as true as we thought. Gates scholar Alex Vail is carrying out research that reveals how fish remember other sea creatures and even people.

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