California’s sudden oak death epidemic now ‘unstoppable’ and new epidemics must be managed earlier

02 May 2016

New research shows the sudden oak death epidemic in California cannot now be stopped, but that its tremendous ecological and economic impacts could have been greatly reduced if control had been started earlier. The research also identifies new strategies to enhance control of future epidemics, including identifying where and how to fell trees, as “there will be a next time”.

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Lack of exercise responsible for twice as many deaths as obesity

14 Jan 2015

A brisk 20 minute walk each day could be enough to reduce an individual’s risk of early death, according to new research published today. The study of over 334,000 European men and women found that twice as many deaths may be attributable to lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributable to obesity, but that just a modest increase in physical activity could have significant health benefits.

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Crowded

The power of thinking big

23 May 2012

Population studies on a vast scale are providing the power to enable accurate risk assessment – and intervention – into cardiovascular disease.

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Time-ordered graph

How quickly things spread

20 Feb 2012

Understanding the spread of infectious diseases in populations is the key to controlling them. If the UK was facing a flu pandemic, how could we measure where the greatest spreading risk comes from? This information could help inform decisions on whether to impose travel restrictions or close schools.

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Hearts' empath

High-risk hearts: a South Asian epidemic

30 Jun 2011

Why is heart disease increasing at a greater rate in South Asia than in any other region globally? Large-scale population studies in Pakistan and Bangladesh aim to discover the basis of a little-studied public health problem of epidemic proportions.

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