Shakespeare goes to East Africa

25 Mar 2016

On the eve of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Dr Edward Wilson-Lee explores the remarkable ways in which the works of England’s greatest poet-playwright are woven into the merging cultures of East Africa. In his debut book, Shakespeare in Swahililand, Wilson-Lee gives a compelling account of an era in which Shakespeare took centre stage.

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The language and literature of chastity

09 Feb 2016

In her debut book, Dr Bonnie Lander Johnson (Faculty of English) shows how deeply the Christian virtue of chastity was embedded into the culture of the early Stuart world.  In the struggle between the newly established Church of England and Roman Catholicism, chastity was a powerful construct that was both personal and political.

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… dot, dot, dot: how the ellipsis made its mark

21 Oct 2015

We avoid them in formal writing but they pepper our emails … In 'Ellipsis in English Literature', Dr Anne Toner explores the history of dots, dashes and asterisks used to mark silence of some kind. The focus of the book – the first to look exclusively at the backstory of these marks – is communication.

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Alice through the ages: revisiting a classic at 150

14 Sep 2015

A five-day programme of events at Homerton College, Cambridge, will celebrate the publication, 150 years ago, of Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’. Here, Dr Zoe Jaques, a lecturer in children’s literature, explores images of Alice from the first edition onwards. 

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Travellers under open skies: writers, artists and gypsies

30 Oct 2014

In her new book Representations of the Gypsy in the Romantic Period, Sarah Houghton-Walker provides a fascinating insight into writers’ and artists’ portrayals of wanderers. Her study focuses on a period when gypsies’ fragile place in the landscape, and on the margins of society, came increasingly under threat.  

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Looking for King Lear in Kashmir

22 Aug 2014

Dr Preti Taneja first read King Lear as a teenager and immediately saw parallels with the Indian culture of her parents’ homeland. Almost 20 years later, she spent six months exploring the subcontinent, tracing the themes that make Shakespeare’s exploration of humanity so compelling, and researching a novel that re-imagines her favourite play. 

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On not forgetting Nadine Gordimer

16 Jul 2014

In this article, originally posted on the CRASSH website, Graham Riach – a PhD candidate in the English Faculty working on South African literature – explores the life and legacy of writer Nadine Gordimer, who recently passed away.

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