Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting

23 Oct 2017

A group of researchers from the UK and the US have used machine learning techniques to successfully predict earthquakes. Although their work was performed in a laboratory setting, the experiment closely mimics real-life conditions, and the results could be used to predict the timing of a real earthquake. 

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Earthquakes without frontiers

26 Oct 2015

The Alpine–Himalayan belt, which stretches from the Mediterranean to the Pacific, is one of the world’s most seismically active regions. Now, a combination of earth science, social science and education is being used to help the region become more resilient to earthquakes, protecting lives and property.

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Lake on the surface of Lirung Glacier. The rapid drainage of such lakes may cause flooding downstream and may have contributed to devastating mudflows during the earthquake.

Perspectives on the Nepal earthquake

28 Apr 2015

As the death toll continues to rise in Nepal, Senior Lecturer Dr Ian Willis, and PhD student Evan Miles, from the Scott Polar Research Institute contemplate the fate of people in a remote part of the country, where they have been doing research for the past two years.

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Amy Donovan

Volcanoes: risk, uncertainty and the next big eruption

23 Oct 2012

As earthquake experts worldwide reflect on an Italian court’s ruling to convict scientists on manslaughter charges for failing to predict the L’Aquila earthquake of 2009, Dr Amy Donovan discusses the importance of a strong connection between scientists and policymakers in helping to communicate risk.

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Haiti after the January 2010 earthquake

Ounce of prevention, pound of cure

09 Oct 2012

Working with humanitarian organisations in Haiti, Cambridge researchers have found that an information system they designed to track how regions recovered from disasters can also be used to support preparedness, planning and project management.

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A wave approaches Miyako City from the Heigawa estuary in Iwate Prefecture

Scientists explain scale of Japanese tsunami

24 Aug 2012

Tsunamis are caused by earthquakes under the seabed. Some tsunamis – including the disaster that hit Japan last year – are unexpectedly large. Cambridge scientists suggest that their severity is caused by a release of gravitational energy as well as elastic energy.

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