The art of engineering: images from the frontiers of technology

12 Nov 2014

From the kaleidoscopic swirl of a neural network, to ribbons of crystals unfolding like sheets of wrapping paper, to the relief on the faces of villagers in Malawi after their local well was repaired, the breadth of engineering research at the University of Cambridge is reflected in the images produced by the winners of this year’s Department of Engineering photo competition.

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Can free movement of workers be stopped?

07 Nov 2014

'How can the government stem the tide of migrant workers coming to the UK?' This question has been asked with increasing vigour by those who perceive immigration as a threat rather than a benefit to the UK economy. In this video, Catherine Barnard considers whether it is possible to restrict free movement of workers under EU law, both as it now stands and going forward.

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Your languages, your future

07 Nov 2014

Research shows that children who speak more than one language have an advantage over their monolingual playmates when it comes to communication, understanding and social interaction. But the benefits go even further if children can be encouraged to take a formal qualification, such as a GCSE, as this short film describes.

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Early stage embryo

Shaping up: Researchers reconstruct early stages of embryo development

04 Nov 2014

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have managed to reconstruct the early stage of mammalian development using embryonic stem cells, showing that a critical mass of cells – not too few, but not too many – is needed for the cells to being self-organising into the correct structure for an embryo to form.

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Out of the red and into the blue: making the LED revolution cost-effective

07 Oct 2014

Today, the Nobel Prize for Physics 2014 has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura for their invention of a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source – the blue light-emitting diode (LED). University of Cambridge researchers are building on their work to produce more cost-effective gallium nitride LEDs that can have widespread use in homes and offices.

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Luck and lava

06 Oct 2014

A team of researchers from Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences have recently returned from Iceland where, thanks to a bit of luck, they have gathered the most extensive dataset ever from a volcanic eruption, which will likely yield considerable new insights into how molten rock moves underground, and whether or not it erupts.

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