The Nobel Prize was established in accordance with the will of Swede, Alfred Nobel – inventor of dynamite and holder of more than 350 patents. Awarded annually since 1901, the Nobel Prize is the first annual international award to recognise achievements in Physics, Medicine, Chemistry, Peace and Literature. Nobel prizes have been awarded to members of Cambridge University for significant advances as diverse as the discovery of the structure of DNA, the development of a national income accounting system, the mastery of an epic and narrative psychological art and the discovery of penicillin.

Affiliates of University of Cambridge have won more Nobel Prizes than those of any other institution.

  • 90 affiliates of the University of Cambridge have won the Nobel Prize since 1904.
  • Affiliates have won in every category, with 29 Nobel prizes in Physics, 26 in Medicine, 21 in Chemistry, nine in Economics, two in Literature and two in Peace.
  • Trinity College has 32 Nobel Prize winners, the most of any college at Cambridge.
  • Dorothy Hodgkin is the first woman from Cambridge to win a Nobel Prize, for her work on the structure of compounds used in fighting anaemia.
  • In 1950, Bertrand Russell became the first person from Cambridge to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, for his 1946 work, ‘A History of Western Philosophy’.
  • Frederick Sanger, from St John’s and fellow of King’s, is one of only four individuals to win a Nobel Prize twice. He won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1958 and 1980.

Cambridge’s Nobel Prize winners

2013 Michael Levitt, Gonville and Caius / Peterhouse Colleges, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems

2012 John Gurdon, Churchill and Magdalene Colleges: Emeritus Professor in Cell Biology: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent

2010 Robert G. Edwards, Churchill College: Emeritus Professor of Human Reproduction: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the development of in vitro fertilization

2009 Venki Ramakrishnan, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome

2009 Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Darwin College, PhD 1975: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase

2008 Roger Y. Tsien, Churchill / Caius Colleges: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP

2007 Martin Evans, Christ's College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discoveries of principles for introducing specific gene modifications in mice by the use of embryonic stem cells

2007 Eric Maskin, Jesus College: Prize in Economic Sciences, for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory

2005 Richard R. Schrock: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis

2002 Sydney Brenner, King's College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death

2002 John Sulston, Pembroke College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death

2001 Tim Hunt, Clare College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discoveries of key regulators of the cell cycle

2001 Joseph Stiglitz, Caius College: Prize in Economics, for analyses of markets with asymmetric information

2000 Paul Greengard: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discoveries concerning signal transduction in the nervous system

2000 Alan McDiarmid, Sidney Sussex College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the discovery and development of conductive polymers

1998 John Pople, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the development of computational methods in quantum chemistry

1998 Amartya Sen, Trinity College: Prize in Economics, for his contributions to welfare economics

1997 John Walker, Sidney Sussex College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for studying how a spinning enzyme creates the molecule that powers cells in muscles

1996 James Mirrlees, Trinity College: Prize in Economics, for studying behaviour in the absence of complete information

1989 Norman Ramsey, Clare College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for developing the separated field method

1984 Richard Stone, Caius College and fellow of King's College: Prize in Economics, for developing a national income accounting system

1984 Georges Kohler Nobel Prize in Medicine, for developing a technique for the production of monoclonal antibodies

1984 Cesar Milstein, Fellow of Darwin and Fitzwilliam Colleges: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for developing a technique for the production of monoclonal antibodies

1983 William Fowler, Pembroke College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the evolution and devolution of stars

1983 Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the evolution and devolution of stars

1983 Gerard Debreu, Churchill College: Prize in Economics, for reforming the theory of general equilibrium

1982 Aaron Klug, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the structure of biologically active substances

1980 Walter Gilbert, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the theory of nucleotide links in nucleic acids

1980 Frederick Sanger, St John's College and fellow of King's College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the theory of nucleotide links in nucleic acids

1979 Steven Weinberg: Nobel Prize in Physics, for electromagnetic and weak particle interactions

1979 Allan Cormack, St John's College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for developing CAT scans

1979 Abdus Salam, St John's College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for electromagnetic and weak particle interactions

1978 Pyotr Kapitsa, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for inventing the helium liquefier

1978 Peter Mitchell, Jesus College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the energy transfer processes in biological systems

1977 Philip Anderson, Churchill College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the behaviour of electrons in magnetic solids

1977 Nevill Mott, Caius / St John's Colleges: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the behaviour of electrons in magnetic solids

1977 James Meade, Christ's/Trinity Colleges: Prize in Economics, for contributions to the theory of international trade

1974 Patrick White, King's College: Nobel Prize in Literature, for an epic and psychological narrative art

1974 Martin Ryle, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the invention of aperture synthesis

1974 Antony Hewish, Caius / Churchill Colleges: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the discovery of pulsars

1973 Brian Josephson, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for the tunnelling in superconductors and semiconductors

1972 Rodney Porter, Pembroke College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the chemical structure of antibodies

1972 Kenneth J Arrow, Churchill College: Prize in Economics, for the equilibrium theory

1972 John Hicks, Caius College: Prize in Economics, for the equilibrium theory

1967 Ronald Norrish, Emmanuel College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the study of fast Chemical reactions

1967 George Porter, Emmanuel College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the study of fast Chemical reactions

1964 Dorothy Hodgkin, Newnham / Girton Colleges: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the structure of compounds used to fight anaemia

1963 Andrew Huxley, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the transmission of impulses along a nerve fibre

1963 Alan Hodgkin, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the transmission of impulses along a nerve fibre

1962 Max Perutz, Peterhouse: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for determining the structure of haemoproteins

1962 Maurice Wilkins, St John's College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for determining the structure of DNA

1962 John Kendrew, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for determining the structure of haemoproteins

1962 James Watson, Clare College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for determining the structure of DNA

1962 Francis Crick, Caius / Churchill Colleges: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for determining the structure of DNA

1959 Philip Noel-Baker, King's College: Nobel Prize in Peace, for work towards global disarmament

1958 Frederick Sanger, St John's College and fellow of King's College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for the structure of the insulin molecule

1957 Alexander Todd, Christ's College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for work on nucleotides

1954 Max Born, Caius College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for fundamental research into quantum mechanics

1953 Hans Krebs: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discovering the citric acid cycle

1952 Richard Synge, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for developing partition chromatography

1952 Archer Martin, Peterhouse: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for developing partition chromatography

1951 John Cockcroft, St John's / Churchill Colleges: Nobel Prize in Physics, for using accelerated particles to study atomic nuclei

1951 Ernest Walton, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for using accelerated particles to study atomic nuclei

1950 Cecil Powell, Sidney Sussex College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for photography of nuclear processes

1950 Bertrand Russell, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Literature, for A History of Western Philosophy, 1946

1948 Patrick Blackett, Magdalene / Kings Colleges: Nobel Prize in Physics, for nuclear physics and cosmic radiation

1947 Edward Appleton, St John's College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for discovering the Appleton Layer

1945 Howard Florey, Caius College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the discovery of penicillin

1945 Ernst Chain, Fitzwilliam College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the discovery of penicillin

1937 George Thomson, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for interference in crystals irradiated by electrons

1937 Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Fitzwilliam College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for combustion in biology

1936 Henry Dale, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for the chemical transmission of nerve impulses

1935 James Chadwick, Caius College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for discovering the neutron

1933 Paul Dirac, St John's College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for quantum mechanics

1932 Lord Adrian, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for work on the function of neurons

1932 Charles Sherrington, Caius College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for work on the function of neurons

1929 Frederick Hopkins, Trinity / Emmanuel Colleges: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for discovering growth stimulating vitamins

1928 Owen Richardson, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for creating Richardson's Law

1927 Charles Wilson, Sidney Sussex College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for inventing the cloud chamber

1927 Arthur Holly Compton: Nobel Prize in Physics, for discovering wavelength change in diffused X-rays

1925 Austen Chamberlain, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Peace, for work on the Locarno Pact, 1925

1922 Niels Bohr, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for investigating atomic structure and radiation

1922 Francis Aston, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for work on mass spectroscopy

1922 Archibald Hill, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Medicine, for work on heat production in the muscles

1917 Charles Barkla, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for discovering the characteristics of X-radiation

1915 William Bragg, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics for analysing crystal structure using X-rays

1915 Lawrence Bragg, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for analysing crystal structure using X-rays

1908 Ernest Rutherford, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for atomic structure and radioactivity

1906 J. J. Thomson, Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for investigating the electrical conductivity of gases

1904 Lord Rayleigh (John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh), Trinity College: Nobel Prize in Physics, for discovering Argon