How single-celled organisms navigate to oxygen

01 Dec 2016

A team of researchers has discovered that tiny clusters of single-celled organisms that inhabit the world’s oceans and lakes, are capable of navigating their way to oxygen.  Writing in e-Life scientists at the University of Cambridge describe how choanaflagellates, the closest relatives of animals, form small colonies that can sense a large range of concentrations of oxygen in the water. The research offers clues as to how these organisms evolved into multi-cellular ones.

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Goldstein wins Batchelor Prize 2016

The G K Batchelor Prize for 2016 is awarded to Professor Raymond E. Goldstein FRS, Schlumberger Professor of Complex Physical Systems in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and Fellow of Churchill College.

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Upside down and inside out

27 Apr 2015

Researchers have captured the first 3D video of a living algal embryo turning itself inside out, from a sphere to a mushroom shape and back again. The results could help unravel the mechanical processes at work during a similar process in animals, which has been called the “most important time in your life.”

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Microscopic rowing – without a cox

29 Jul 2014

New research shows that the whip-like appendages on many types of cells are able to synchronise their movements solely through interactions with the fluid that surrounds them.

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A new twist on soap films

23 May 2014

Soap films with complex shapes shed light on the formation of mathematical singularities, which occur in a broad range of fields.

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Discover: scientific imagery

31 Jan 2013

Cutting-edge science, and its communication to the public, is often brought to life with sophisticated imagery. But how do you go about photographing a distant star formation or the inside of a locust’s brain? Cambridge researchers and technicians reveal all.

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How sperm swim near surfaces

How sperm swim near surfaces

08 Jan 2013

Using high-speed microscopic imaging, Professor Raymond Goldstein's group in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics has demonstrated how the interactions of microbes such as sperm cells and algae with solid surfaces are considerably more complex than previously thought.

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Algal cell swimming towards a wall

Microswimmers hit the wall

07 Jan 2013

New research reveals what happens when swimming cells such as spermatozoa and algae hit a solid wall, and has implications for applications in diagnostics and biofuel production.

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