£85 million gift from the Dolby family to transform Cambridge science

06 Dec 2017

The University of Cambridge has received an £85 million gift from the estate of Ray Dolby, founder of Dolby Laboratories and its world-renowned Dolby Noise Reduction, Dolby Surround, and successor audio signal processing technologies, which have revolutionised the audio quality of music, motion pictures, and television worldwide. 

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£75 million investment for University's Cavendish Laboratory

25 Nov 2015

The Government has announced a £75 million investment in the University of Cambridge Cavendish Laboratory as part of Wednesday's Spending Review. This will be matched with a further £75 million from the University to transform the Cavendish, helping maintain Britain’s position at the forefront of physical sciences research.

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Large Hadron Collider restarts after two years

07 Apr 2015

After two years of intense maintenance and consolidation, and several months of preparation for restart, the Large Hadron Collider, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, is back in operation after a major upgrade.

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Image-guided intensity modulated RT plan for a patient with a spinal  tumour. The radiation dose is shaped away from the kidneys (yellow  outlines) and the spinal nerve roots (inside the green outline). The colour wash represents radiation dose

Project to improve radiotherapy planning

30 Jan 2012

A collaborative project between physicists, oncologists and computer scientists at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, launched last month, will develop improved tools for the planning of high precision radiotherapy. Accel-RT will also help overcome time constraints that currently limit the use of complex radiotherapy treatment.

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Fast Hands

High-performance problem-solving

01 Jun 2007

Computers already make an enormous impact on our quality of life by reducing the cost of developing new products and enhancing their safety. According to Moore’s Law, the performance of computers doubles every 18 months. Despite this, many scientific problems are still too complicated to be solved on standard computers and new approaches are needed.

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