Super-slow circulation allowed world’s oceans to store huge amounts of carbon during the last ice age

27 Jun 2016

The way the ocean transported heat, nutrients and carbon dioxide at the peak of the last ice age, about 20,000 years ago, is significantly different than what has previously been suggested, according to two new studies. The findings suggest that the colder ocean circulated at a very slow rate, which enabled it to store much more carbon for much longer than the modern ocean.

Read More

Minecraft tree “probably” the tallest tree in the Tropics

08 Jun 2016

A tree the height of 20 London double-decker buses has been discovered in Malaysia by conservation scientists monitoring the impact of human activity on the biodiversity of a pristine rainforest. The tree, a Yellow  Meranti, is one of the species that can be grown in the computer game Minecraft.

Read More

Earthquakes without frontiers

26 Oct 2015

The Alpine–Himalayan belt, which stretches from the Mediterranean to the Pacific, is one of the world’s most seismically active regions. Now, a combination of earth science, social science and education is being used to help the region become more resilient to earthquakes, protecting lives and property.

Read More

Not a drop to drink

19 Oct 2015

A major research collaboration is looking at how small towns in the hills of India and Nepal are coping with increasing demand for water: who wins and who loses when resources get scarce?

Read More

Compiling a ‘dentist’s handbook’ for penis worms

06 May 2015

A new study of teeth belonging to a particularly phallic-looking creature has led to the compilation of a prehistoric ‘dentist’s handbook’ which may aid in the identification of previously unrecognised specimens from the Cambrian period, 500 million years ago.

Read More
Ebola virus

Emerging diseases likely to be more harmful in similar species

17 Mar 2015

When viruses such as influenza and Ebola jump from one species to another, their ability to cause harm can change dramatically, but research from the University of Cambridge shows that it may be possible to predict the virus’s virulence by looking at how deadly it is in closely-related species.

Read More

Pages