How single-celled organisms navigate to oxygen

01 Dec 2016

A team of researchers has discovered that tiny clusters of single-celled organisms that inhabit the world’s oceans and lakes, are capable of navigating their way to oxygen.  Writing in e-Life scientists at the University of Cambridge describe how choanaflagellates, the closest relatives of animals, form small colonies that can sense a large range of concentrations of oxygen in the water. The research offers clues as to how these organisms evolved into multi-cellular ones.

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What can Pokémon Go teach the world of conservation?

16 Nov 2016

The augmented reality game, designed for mobile devices, allows users to capture, battle and train virtual creatures called Pokémon that appear on screen as if part of the real-world environment. But can the game's enormous success deliver any lessons to the fields of natural history and conservation?

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What makes a sand dune sing?

04 Nov 2016

When solids flow like liquids they can make sand dunes sing, and they can also result in a potentially deadly avalanche. Cambridge researchers are studying the physics behind both of these phenomena, which could have applications in industries such as pharmaceuticals, oil and gas.

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