‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers

21 Dec 2016

Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published today in the journal Nature Communications. The study, led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, solves a long-standing mystery of how key sugars in cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials.

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Dr Bombelli demonstrates his work at a science festival

Celebrating impact

21 Jun 2016

The inaugural Impact and Public Engagement with Research Awards took place yesterday, recognising staff whose research goes beyond the academic setting. 

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Could the food we eat affect our genes? Study in yeast suggests this may be the case

11 Feb 2016

Almost all of our genes may be influenced by the food we eat, according to new research published in the journal Nature Microbiology. The study, carried out in yeast – which can be used to model some of the body’s fundamental processes – shows that while the activity of our genes influences our metabolism, the opposite is also true and the nutrients available to cells influence our genes.

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Moonlighting molecules: finding new uses for old enzymes

26 Nov 2015

A collaboration between the University of Cambridge and MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, has led researchers to identify a potentially significant new application for a well-known human enzyme, which may have implications for treating respiratory diseases such as asthma.

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Gagna A. & Ch. Van Heck Prize awarded to Professor Steve Jackson

Professor Steve Jackson, Head of Cancer Research UK Labs and Senior Group Leader at the Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, has been awarded the Gagna A. & Ch. Van Heck Prize 2015 in Belgium, "for his cardinal contributions related to cellular events that detect, signal the presence of and repair DNA damages".

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