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Research

“Trust me, I’m a banker”

In a post-­crash economy, the financial industry has taken a severe hammering in the courts of public approval. Banks have never been trusted less. In a capitalist society, that’s not good news. But now bankers may have some unlikely new saviours: philosophers.

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Research

Luck and lava

A team of researchers from Cambridge’s Department of Earth Sciences have recently returned from Iceland where, thanks to a bit of luck, they have gathered the most extensive dataset ever from a volcanic eruption, which will likely yield considerable new insights into how molten rock moves underground, and whether or not it erupts.

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Research
Straw coloured fruit bat

Understanding the bushmeat market: why do people risk infection from bat meat?

Ebola, as with many emerging infections, is likely to have arisen due to man’s interaction with wild animals – most likely the practice of hunting and eating wild meat known as ‘bushmeat’. A team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has surveyed almost six hundred people across southern Ghana to find out what drives consumption of bat bushmeat – and how people perceive the risks associated with the practice.

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Research

Out of the red and into the blue: making the LED revolution cost-effective

Today, the Nobel Prize for Physics 2014 has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura for their invention of a new energy-efficient and environment-friendly light source – the blue light-emitting diode (LED). University of Cambridge researchers are building on their work to produce more cost-effective gallium nitride LEDs that can have widespread use in homes and offices.

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